e-DARE
Newsletter on Human Rights Education
and Education for Democracy
Year 3, issue 2 (6 February 2006)
www.dare-network.org
Published by the DARE project

Table of content

1. Letter from the chair
2. European Year for Citizenship through Education – National Experiences – European Challenges
3. "Stand up for your beliefs“. A workshop on civil courage
4. Projects market place Thursday 1st December 2005
5. E-learning course in German: Introduction to Human Rights Education
6. EDC Action Days
7. Tight EU budget agreement
8. EU funding opportunities
a. General
b. Cofinancing with european development NGOs: actions to raise public awareness of development issues in Europe
c. European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 1 - Promoting Justice and the Rule of Law
d. European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 2 - Fostering a culture of human rights
e. European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 3 - Promoting the democratic process
f. European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 4 - Advancing equality, tolerance and peace
Editor

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1. Letter from the chair

Berlin, February 2006

Dear friends and colleagues,

The first edition of e-DARE for 2006 begins with a positive message for the DARE community: our pre-proposal for a Grundtvig-follow-up project for DARE has been approved. We now have to write the main proposal by 1st March and shall be in close contact and mutual dialogue with all DARE members who decided to join the project - including the two new participating organisations from Latvia and Sweden.

Looking back to December 2005, the Berlin conference organised by DARE in conjunction with German Federal Agency, the European Association for the Education of Adults and the Austrian Ministry of Education, Science and Culture attracted a substantial audience. 282 participants from 41 countries attended the event. DARE members played an active role in this stocktaking meeting of professionals and experts from formal and non-formal education, representatives of national and European authorities and interested citizens designed as a culmination for the European Year of Citizenship through Education. DARE propel contributed to country profiles, presented models of EDC and HRE, acted as facilitators in the workshops, and presented training sessions. The importance of education for human rights and democracy was stressed in all contributions – hopefully the message will not only be heard, but will have practical outcomes. The official evaluation conference of the Council of Europe at the end of EYCE will take place 27/28 April 2006 in Romania - with a promising motto “Learning and Living Democracy: the Way Ahead”.

The evening before the conference DARE organised a project fair for members so as to promote and improve cooperation between members and encourage new ways and ideas in education for democracy and human rights. Chrissie Dell and Wim Taelman prepared and facilitated the meeting, which was attended by 45 colleagues, each presenting his/her proposal for a transnational project.

We should once more like to draw your attention to forthcoming activities. As announced already in the last e-DARE, the meeting on gender perspectives in EDC and HRE will take place in April in Vilnius, organised by the Lithuanian Centre for Human Rights. Dates: 20th-22nd April (arrival 19th, departure 23rd April). As last year in Sofia, the meeting will be combined with the General Assembly of the network. Please, reserve the date in your schedule!

Finally I would like to inform you:
1. The Technical Assistance Office (TAO) of the European Commission, partner for the programmes LEONARDO, SOCRATES, YOUTH will be replaced in the course of January 2006 by a new established agency EACEA, Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency.

2. The European Cultural Foundation (ECF) and ECUMEST has produced a research paper on current funding possibilities for international cultural projects with South-East Europe. Information under: http://www.ecumest.ro/pdf/SEE_funders_survey_Oct2005.pdf

3. The European Commission has instigated an online survey for young people focusing on the promotion of active citizenship: http://europa.eu.int/yourvoice/ipm/forms

With best wishes for a good start to 2006!

Hannelore Chiout, chair of DARE, chiout@adbildungsstaetten.de, AdB

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2. European Year for Citizenship through Education – National Experiences – European Challenges

From 2nd to 4th December 2005, around three hundred participants from 41 countries met in Berlin. Goal of this conference: a stocktaking of the European Year for Citizenship through education, presentation of successful outcomes, and discussion of conditions for a framework which would secure the results of this Council of Europe campaign. DARE was one of the conference organisers together with the German Federal Agency for Civic Education, the European Association for the Education of Adults and the Austrian Federal Ministry for Education. DARE was highly visible through our many contributions in all areas of the conference: training (three out of the four training sessions were led by DARE members), country profiles (ten of the nineteen reports were given by DARE members) and working group inputs. For our network this conference was a highlight in community building and gave us a feeling of cohesion.

Hannelore Chiout, chair of the DARE network, stressed in her opening speech the need to respect the diversity of approaches to this educational field amongst the growing community of European member states - this diversity is a strength we must be aware of, and protecting. democracy needs educated people. Education should promote and give reality to the values of democratic culture, respect, justice and social cohesion on the basis of human rights.

An inside view was given by practitioners in the field of education from nineteen European countries and examples of good practice from twelve countries - overviews on the situation for EDC in the various countries, outcomes, challenges and demands for the future. In summary there was consensus that EYCE raised awareness of the diversity and importance of EDC and strengthened the cooperation between formal and non-formal education. A volume of training material and of good practice examples has been documented in publications and websites. The contributions from post-Communist countries like the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and the Baltic states focused on the difficulties of implementing EDC programmes, the lack of understanding of the importance of active citizenship and democracy, and the lack of evaluation of the EDC programmes.

There exists a very high demand and hope: Education should minimise the apathy and scepticism about democracy and its structure and function and motivate citizens to take an active part at local, regional and national level. Local NGOs put this into practice, but are less and less financially and structurally supported. Sustainability and long term projects are needed to change the apathy, to involve participants in processes of critical thinking and constructive initiatives, in the process of “learning and living democracy”.

Rolf Annaberg, chef de cabinet to Commissioner Margot Wallström - Vice-President and responsible for Institutional Relations and Communication Strategy - presented and discussed with the conference Plan D – Democracy, Dialogue and Debate, a direct reaction to the two 'No' votes by EU founding member states on the draft constitution. Ms Wallström launched the idea during the 20th September 2005 seminar on the future of the EU. The idea is to win back citizens' confidence in the European project through local and national exercises of listening and debate. Plan D's main idea is to help member states to organise national debates on the future of the Union.
“Faced with the challenges of globalisation, people are asking tough questions about job security and pensions, about migration and living standards. Europe must renew so it is part of the solution to those challenges. Plan D aims to inject more democracy into the Union, to stimulate a wide public debate and build a new consensus on the future direction of the European Union.”
Find the paper at: http://europa.eu.int/comm/commission_barroso/wallstrom/pdf/communication_planD_en.pdf

Claudia Lohrenscheit from the German Institute of Human Rights focused her contribution on the links and the differences between EDC and HRE. This has also been an important topic of debates within the DARE network. You will find her full text in our second publication.

At a reception of the dz-Bank – a very exceptional building designed by Frank O. Gehry – an internet portal was launched by the German Federal Agency: www.europtopic.net. In future this will promote transnational participatory debates.

A large number of participants had subscribed to the interactive training sessions. In fact only half of them took part, but with much positive interaction. The training sessions gave the opportunity to experience, to discuss and reflect training methods from different sectors of EDC.

Topics featured included:

  • "Stand up for your beliefs" with Forum theatre and other methods of drama education (see under)
  • Training on gender democracy
  • Workshop on non-violent conflict handling
  • Workshop on intercultural learning

All these training modules adopted an interactive and participatory approach and involved the participants in a creative and lively way in the main issues of EDC.

* What was missing? Time is always too limited, contributions are often diverse such that it is hard to compare and conclude or summarise. More time for working group discussions and interaction is needed so as to get into a deeper exchange. And the biggest question: How could we bring the conclusions and experiences into a relevant impact and effect on the political level. DARE should address this in future.

Find papers and more at:
http://www.bpb.de/veranstaltungen/F162CR,0,EYCE_2005%3A_National_Experiences_European_Challenges.html

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3. "Somebody must react. But what if I get hurt?“
A workshop on civil courage

“Stand up for your beliefs” was the title of an interactive workshop during the conference National Experiences - European Challenges which was held at the end of the “European Year of Citizenship through Education” (EYCE) 2005 in Berlin. It was obvious that working on such a challenging topic in only three and a half hours would be a real dare. But thanks to the very open and active participants who managed to be playful and serious at the same time, the challenge was met.

The workshop started with getting to know each other through sharing what civil courage meant for the participants. They exchanged their ideas and associations related to the topic: stories, episodes, experiences, pieces of music and art etc. Not surprisingly, it turned out that everybody had frequently experienced situations where he or she had the feeling “That is not okay, something has to be done”. In some cases, people reacted immediately, in others they started to consider whether to intervene or not and how to do it.

If a person feels the need to stand up for the rights of somebody else, for example in order to prevent/stop violence, racist or sexist assaults, he or she is often confronted with at least two “inner voices” that appear mutually adverse. One voice would argue for intervention (“somebody must react”), appealing to the bystander’s convictions and beliefs in humanity, solidarity and human rights. The other voice would try to prevent the person from intervening, addressing mainly his or her fears (“I don’t want to put myself into a dangerous situation I cannot control”) or questioning one’s responsibility for the situation (“That’s not my job”) as well as one’s capability to intervene (“I simply can’t do that”). It is important to listen to these voices and to be aware of their messages in order to learn more about oneself.

In 1969, the two social psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latané described a model of intervention involving five stages - which can be summarised as follows:

  1. perception: noticing the problem
  2. interpretation: deciding if it is an emergency
  3. commitment: taking responsibility
  4. strategy: deciding what to do
  5. action: taking action to help.

During the workshop in Berlin, participants recalled situations where they felt the need to stand up for their beliefs and for somebody else’s rights. In groups of four, using a sculpture technique adopted from Augusto Boal’s “theatre of the oppressed”, they revived such situations and parts of the related emotions. After such an impressive “gallery of civil courage sculptures”, several participants had the chance to reflect their experiences even more deeply in their particular group: They defined each central message of their two adverse inner voices and asked two of their fellow participants to step into the role of one specific inner voice each. This method enabled them to step into a dialogue with one of their inner voices. They also received additional insights from the fourth person who had the role of a wise being that was consulted rather as an oracle than as an ordinary advisor. One of these stories was acted out as a forum theatre (again a technique developed by Augusto Boal), giving everybody the chance to try out his or her ideas for intervening non-violently.

The second part of the workshop mainly focussed on the five stages as defined by Latané & Darley. Small working groups exchanged ideas and experiences re the competences individuals would need at each specific stage as well as methods and techniques as to how to address such competences in education. At the end, all participants shaped a monument of civil courage together and performed it as a big sculpture on the stage of the conference plenary.

References:

Reinhard Eckert, Service Centre for Human Rights Education - Vienna, reinhard.eckert@univie.ac.at
Aniko Kaposvari, Foundation for Human Rights and Peace Education – Budapest, ankohu@yahoo.com

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4. Projects market place Thursday 1 December 2005

It was great to see so many DARE colleagues at the projects market place before the conference in Berlin. It had been suggested that we should present our ideas in a poster format, as is the custom at many academic conferences. Several organisations presented outlines of their proposed projects needing partners from other organisations. The rest of the evening was made available for members to look at the posters and ask questions about the projects they were particularly interested in. There was also plenty of time for catching up with old friends, making new friends and networking.
Below you will find a few of the project titles and contact details. Hopefully new partnerships and exciting projects will develop through the DARE network.

If your organisation made a presentation in December and you are still looking for partners or you have new project ideas, perhaps you would like to forward to me, Chrissie Dell email: c.dell@yorksj.ac.uk or Wim Taelman email: wim.taelman@vormen.org and they could be included in a future e-dare newsletter.

Project proposal titles

NGO E.I.P. Italy - School as an instrument of peace independent national section
Youth Section: Valentina Cinti - valentinacinti@jumpy.it Armonia Pierantozzi - armonia.pierantozzi@fastwebnet.it
Project: SUM School University Mass Media; Youth role in the European framework: the right to participate in society through mass media

Human Rights Education Centre of Charles University
Director Alena Kroupová, e-mail: alena.kroupova@eis.cuni.cz
Project: Children and mass media - improving culture of mass media

Mali Korak – Centre for Culture of Peace and Non-Violence
Contact: Maja Uzelac email: muzelac@zamir.net
Project: a pilot joint project with education materials on global and European issues - especially conflict in WE and SEE countries with instructions how to implement in different learning environments.

Centre for Global Education, York and Leeds Development Education Centre
Contact: Margot Brown email: global.ed@btinternet.com
Project: Talking the Same Language: a project for teachers of community languages and MFL to include the global dimension

VORMEN vzw, Antwerp (Belgium)
Contact: Wim Taelman; e-mail: wim.taelman@vormen.org
Project: Developing an integrated approach on human rights education, citizenship education and education for sustainable development for secondary schools

Finally, a big thank you to AdB, especially Hannelore and Katrin, for hosting the event and providing the delicious meal that we all enjoyed.

Chrissie Dell, Centre for Global Education, York, c.dell@yorksj.ac.uk

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5. E-learning course in German: Introduction to Human Rights Education

HREA will be offering its distance learning course "Introduction to Human Rights Education" for the first time in German this year. Course instructor is Dr. Karl-Peter Fritzsche UNESCO Chair in Human Rights Education at the University of Magdeburg (Germany). Courses description and application forms can be found at: http://www.hrea.org/courses/8D.html

The application deadline is 8 February 2006. The English version of the course will be offered again in the second semester of 2007 (http://www.hrea.org/courses/8E.html).

Anna Langenbach, HREA E-mail: applications@hrea.org

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6. EDC Action Days

Dear colleagues and friends,

In spring it will be Austria's fourth time to organise the EDC Action Days. In 2005, Germany has also taken up this initiative in order to promote citizenship education. The German Federal Agency for Civic Education and the Department for Citizenship Education of the Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Science and Culture are now pursuing the common goal to export this idea to other Council of Europe member states.

From our perspective, EDC Action Days additionally carried out in other countries around May 5 - the day the Council of Europe was officially founded - would definitely enhance and improve European cooperation in this area. Moreover, such activities as well as similar ones can contribute to take up and disseminate experiences made during the European Year ofCitizenship through Education and to keep the started initiatives going.

May be in one of your countries you would like to label even only a few of your activities in May 2006 as EDC Action Days. It would be a chance to make the national public realise that there is a vivid concern for citizenship education in European countries.

The dates already fixed for 2006 are as follows:

Austria: April 16 to May 5, 2006
Germany: May 5 to 23, 2006

Naturally we would be glad to pass on to you any information needed. The Austrian Ministry of Education, Science and Culture and the German Federal Agency for Civic Education would like to contribute to the creation of a lively network by making available for free use the logos and print documents for your adaptation. In individual cases we can also share know-how with you in workshops or advisory talks.

For more information please visit:

Austria: www.aktionstage.politische-bildung.at
Germany: www.bpb.de/aktionstage2006
or contact:
Jutta Spoden for Germany: spoden@bpb.de
Sigrid Steininger for Austria: sigrid.steininger@bmbwk.gv.at

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7. Tight EU budget agreement (news release from EAEA)

European Heads of State and government reached an agreement last month on the future EU financial perspectives for the period 2007-2013. Divided in five sections, future expenditure falls far short of the European Commission's proposals, especially for Research, Education and Training policies.

More on http://www.eaea.org/news.php?k=8536&aid=8536

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8. EU funding opportunities

a) General

Looking for funding opportunities under ‘EuropeAid’? http://www.europa.eu.int/comm/europeaid/cgi/frame12.pl

Click on: STATUS: open; TYPES: grant; Region: all; countries: all; then on ‘SEND’ Then go through the list. You find all the relevant documents there, in a downloadable version.

EuropeAid’s mission is “to implement the external aid instruments of the European Commission which are funded by the European Community budget and the European Development Fund. It does not deal with pre-accession aid programmes (Phare, Ispa and Sapard), humanitarian activities, macro-financial assistance, the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) or the Rapid Reaction Facility.

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b) Cofinancing with european development NGOs: actions to raise public awareness of development issues in Europe

(From the ‘Guidelines for grant applicants responding to the call for proposals’ )

Open Call for Proposals; Budget line 21-02-03 (ex-B7-6000); Reference: EuropeAid/122548/C/ACT/multi
Deadline for receipt of applications: 23 March 2006

Priority will be given to actions that meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • They aim to highlight the interdependence of the EU and developing countries,
  • They seek to mobilise support for more equitable North-South relations,
  • They encourage cooperation between NGOs
  • They enable partners in the developing countries to play an active part.
  • They ensure an enlarged EU dimension by involving NGOs from the new member states, including actions that facilitate exchanges of experiences and networking between NGOs from the fifteen member states and the member states which joined the EU in May 2004.

The Community grant applied for must fall within EUR 50,000 (minimum amount) and EUR 1,080,000 (maximum amount).
Duration: 1 – 3 years
No grant may exceed 75,00 % of the total eligible costs.

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c) European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 1 - Promoting Justice and the Rule of Law
Reference: EuropeAid/122510/C/ACT/Multi
Status: Open (until 21.03.2006)

(From the ‘Guidelines for grant applicants responding to the call for proposals’ )

LOT 1: The effective functioning of ICC and other international criminal tribunals including their interaction with national justice systems

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

  • Support for the effective functioning of international criminal ad hoc tribunals
  • Promotion of an increased universality of the Rome Statute
  • Support for the preparation and adoption by national legislations of implementation of the Rome Statute
  • Implementation of the complementarity principle between the ICC and national judicial systems.

LOT 2: The progressively restrictive use of the death penalty and its eventual universal abolition

Reflecting the EU’s longstanding commitment to the universal abolition of the death penalty, this LOT will focus support upon the following priorities:

  • Raising awareness amongst the public and key opinion-makers on the principal arguments against the death penalty
  • Monitoring of the conditions of implementation of the death penalty and the application of minimum international standards
  • Promotion of the signature, ratification and implementation of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) (http://www.ohchr.org/English/law/ccpr-death.htm)
  • Legal reform to limit the use of or abolish the death penalty and provide legal assistance in cases of particular concern.

LOT 3: Reinforcement of the work of international human rights mechanisms

This LOT will focus on support to the following priorities:

  • Support relating to UN human rights treaty bodies, in particular raising awareness as to the role of treaty bodies, input to those bodies and implementation of treaty body recommendations.
  • Support for activities relating to UN special mechanisms, including special rapporteurs, focusing on facilitating the input of civil society actors into the work of the mechanisms and follow-up to concerns raised in their reports.

A proposal may not address priorities from more than one LOT.
N.B: Gender equality and the rights of children must be mainstreamed in all project proposals.

Duration: 1 – 3 years
Actions may take place at national, regional or global level. Priorities in these are summarised in the relevant document.
The Community grant applied for must fall within EUR xxx (minimum amount) and EUR xxx (maximum amount): different for LOT 1/2/3
No grant may exceed x,00 % of the total eligible costs: different for LOT 1/2/3

More precise information: read the relevant document, downloadable from the EuropAid website.

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d) European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 2 - Fostering a culture of human rights
Reference: EuropeAid/122582/C/ACT/Multi
Status: Open (until 02.03.2006)

(From the ‘Guidelines for grant applicants responding to the call for proposals’ )

Lot 1: Advancing the rights of marginalised or vulnerable groups

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

Promotion of the rights of women and children, including equal treatment of women - in particular their physical integrity, fighting harmful traditional practices and other forms of cultural coercion such as female genital mutilation, trafficking of women and children, children in armed conflicts and gender-based violence in conflict zones. (NB for the purposes of this call harmful traditional practices should not be addressed as a health care issue but as a human rights issue)

This LOT in no way represents the only EIDHR support to the advancement of the rights of women and children. Proposals for projects specifically targeting children or women can be presented under the other EIDHR campaigns, in accordance with their particular focus. In addition all projects funded under the EIDHR should mainstream children’s rights as well as gender equality.

This Lot will also promote the rights of defenders of human rights. It will improve the protection of, and raise awareness about, the situation of those who work, at personal risk, to advance human rights through non-violent means. For the purpose of this call “Human rights defenders” is here understood as individuals, groups and associations contributing to the effective elimination of all violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of peoples and individuals.

Lot 2: Prevention of torture

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

  • support for the implementation of the EU guidelines on policy towards third countries on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment;
  • support for awareness-raising activities about the Optional Protocol to the UN Convention Against Torture, and to promote its signature, ratification and effective implementation;
  • training of key personnel;
  • awareness-raising and lobbying activities;
  • the tracking of supply of torture instruments;
  • research and publication into torture practices, which shall include activities focused on the root causes of torture and the typology of victims;
  • provision of assistance to individuals threatened with torture, which may include legal advice, lobbying and awareness-raising.

Lot 3: Rehabilitation of victims of torture

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities: support for the rehabilitation of victims or their families who have suffered torture. These projects may also include aspects of prevention of torture representing up to 20% of the project cost.

Applicants may present their request for funding in the form of a specific project and/or may apply to cover their ordinary operational costs (“operating grant”).

For the purposes of this call, the term "torture" means any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in or incidental to, lawful sanctions.

A proposal may not address priorities from more than one LOT.
Gender equality and the rights of children must be mainstreamed in all proposals.
The Community grant applied for must fall within EUR xxx (minimum amount) and EUR xxx (maximum amount): different for LOT 1/2/3
No grant may exceed x % of the total eligible costs: different for LOT 1/2/3

For more precise information read the relevant document, downloadable from the EuropAid website.

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e) European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 3 - Promoting the democratic process
Reference: EuropeAid/122581/C/ACT/Multi
Status: Open (until 28.02.2006)

(From the ‘Guidelines for grant applicants responding to the call for proposals’ )

LOT 1: Underpinning and developing the democratic electoral processes

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

  • civic and voter education/public awareness-raising and voter information programmes; capacity building and technical assistance for local observers’ organisations;
  • capacity building and technical assistance to specialised regional organisations in order to enhance their capacity to operate according to best electoral observation methodology practice;
  • training of legal/judicial professionals in electoral resolution mechanisms to promote public awareness of the legal framework and procedures regulating the electoral processes;
  • training of media institutions and journalists on electoral administration issues in order to improve their reporting on electoral processes.

In the post-election period, EIDHR support funding may include projects, in conjunction with national election commissions and Parliaments, which promote political pluralism by:

  • advocating legal reforms enabling political parties and candidates to form and function freely at national and local level;
  • or by providing training for parliamentarians and key staff of these institutions.

Special attention should be paid to those legal provisions that limit access of women and other disadvantaged groups to active political life.

LOT 2: Strengthening the basis for civil society dialogue and democratic discourse through freedom of association.

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

Freedom of association, including the free formation of professional associations, trade unions and political parties and raising of public awareness about the role of freedom of association in the democratic process. Support will be provided to activities aimed at bringing national legislation into line with the respective international standards, raising awareness amongst decision-makers, and establishing information networks.

LOT 3: Strengthening the basis for civil society dialogue and democratic discourse through freedom of expression

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

Freedom of expression with particular emphasis on the media environment. This may include support for activities to foster independent press and broadcasting including through eliminating legal and technical obstacles, abolishing censorship, raising awareness amongst journalists, improving media professionalism, and promoting appropriate communication and media legislation as well as through fostering unimpeded civil society access to all media including the internet. Activities may aim at the establishment of viable community media which reach remote local communities and enable marginalised sections of civil society to gain a voice. There is also a need to assist and encourage independent media organisations which are committed to raising professional standards and to developing professional skills in a self-regulating environment. Special attention should be paid to equal participation of women in political processes and decision-making.

A proposal may not address priorities from more than one LOT.

Gender equality and the rights of children must be mainstreamed in all project proposals.
The Community grant applied for must fall within EUR 150,000 (minimum amount) and EUR 1,000,000 (maximum amount).
No grant may exceed 80,00 % of the total eligible costs (minimum: 50%).
More precise information: read the relevant document, downloadable from the EuropAid website.

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f) European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights Campaign 4 - Advancing equality, tolerance and peace
Reference: EuropeAid/122583/C/ACT/Multi
Status: Open (until 09.03.2006)

(From the ‘Guidelines for grant applicants responding to the call for proposals’ )

Lot 1: Combating racism and xenophobia and promoting the rights of peoples belonging to minorities

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities:

Support for advocacy to realise the rights of persons facing discrimination on grounds of religious, racial, ethnic or caste background. The campaign will encourage the adoption of anti-discrimination legislation and policies at national level and the removal of discrimination in access to employment, education and other rights. It will promote fair and non-discriminatory representation and participation of minorities and caste-affected groups at all levels of decision-making. The campaign will also develop the capacity of anti-discrimination bodies and support projects to promote intercultural and interethnic understanding, including by encouraging the development of community groups and positive media engagement.

Lot 2: Promoting the rights of indigenous peoples

This LOT will focus upon the following priorities: Raising public awareness of the situation and living conditions of indigenous peoples, and promoting knowledge and understanding of their rights, in particular the right to live on their own land and to own property. Projects of capacity-building will be encouraged, including enhancing information flows, providing specialised workshops and supporting network building amongst indigenous peoples’ organisations at national and regional level. Support will also be provided for the preparation and activities of indigenous peoples’ representatives participating in relevant international fora and also for cooperation with international organisations.

A proposal may not address priorities from more than one LOT.

For both Lots, particular attention should be paid to ensure that gender equality and the rights of children are reflected in all activities. Moreover, preference will be given to proposals that include aspects to promote the objectives of conflict prevention and conflict resolution and that promote cross-cultural and inter-religious understanding.

The Community grant applied for must fall within EUR 150,000 (minimum amount) and EUR 1,000,000 (maximum amount).
No grant may exceed 80,00 % of the total eligible costs (minimum: 50%).
More precise information: read the relevant document, downloadable from the EuropAid website.

Information compiled by Wim Taelman, VORMEN vzw (www.vormen.org), wim.taelman@vormen.org

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This newsletter is edited by the DARE project, 'Democracy and Human Rights Education in Adult Learning', which receives funding from the European Community (Socrates programme, Grundtvig action).
The DARE project is an initiative of the network DARE vzw, Democracy and Human Rights Education in Europe, and is distributed to the project partners, the DARE members and to interested third persons, organisations and institutions.

Editor Wim Taelman
Address:
DARE, c/o VORMEN vzw
Lange Gasthuisstraat 29
B-2000 Antwerp (Belgium)

Contributions for this newsletter can be sent to: wim.taelman@vormen.org

DARE correspondence address (project and network):

Hannelore CHIOUT
DARE network chairperson
AdB
Mühlendamm 3
D-10178 Berlin, Germany
Tel.: 00-49-30-400 401 17
Fax: 00-49-30-400 401 22
E-mail: chiout@adbildungsstaetten.de
Url: www.dare-network.org
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